Commentary From Elliott Wave International

Which Method Can Traders Use to Confirm an Elliott Wave Count? 
Jeffrey Kennedy has developed a theory that guides his analysis 
March 8, 2012

By Elliott Wave International

When you are watching a pattern develop on a chart, how can you be sure that your wave count is correct? The Elliott Wave Principle offers rules and guidelines that you can use to add confidence to your wave count.

Elliott Wave International's Senior Analyst Jeffrey Kennedy spent years designing his own technique to improve his accuracy. He came up with the Jeffrey Kennedy Channeling Technique, which he uses to confirm his wave counts. The following excerpt from Jeffrey's Trader's Classroom lessons, a regular feature of his Futures Junctures Service, offers an overview of his method.


My theory is simple: Five waves break down into three channels, and three waves need only one. The price movement in and out of these channels confirms each Elliott wave.

Base Channel
Figure 61 shows three separate five-wave patterns with three different channels drawn: the base channel, the acceleration channel and the deceleration channel.

The base channel contains the origin of wave one, the end of wave two and the extreme of wave one (Figure 61A). Of the three channels, the base channel is most important, because it defines the trend. As long as prices stay within the base channel, we can safely consider the price action corrective. Over the years, I've discovered that most corrective wave patterns stay within one price channel (Figure 62). Only after prices have moved through the upper or lower boundary lines of this channel is an impulsive wave count suitable, which brings us to the acceleration channel.

Acceleration Channel
The acceleration channel encompasses wave three. Use the extreme of wave one, the most recent high and the bottom of wave two to draw this channel (Figure 61B). As wave three develops, you�ll need to redraw the acceleration channel to accommodate new highs.

Once prices break through the lower boundary line of the acceleration channel, we have confirmation that wave three is over and that wave four is unfolding. I have noticed that wave four will often end near the upper boundary line of the base channel or moderately within the parallel lines. If prices break through the lower boundary line of the base channel decisively, it means the trend is down, and you need to draw new channels.

Deceleration Channel
The deceleration channel contains wave four (Figure 61C). To draw the deceleration channel, simply connect the extremes of wave three and wave B with a trend line. Take a parallel of this line, and place it on the extreme of wave A. As I mentioned before, price action that stays within one price channel is often corrective. When prices break through the upper boundary line of this channel, you can expect a fifth-wave rally next.

In a nutshell, prices need to break out of the base channel to confirm the trend. Movement out of the acceleration channel confirms that wave four is in force, and penetration of the deceleration channel lines signals that wave five is under way.

 

Forex Market Insight: EUR/USD Rallies...Why? 
Elliott wave patterns suggested a bullish reversal a day before the rally 
February 23, 2012

By Elliott Wave International

On February 16, EUR/USD, the euro-dollar exchange rate and the most actively traded forex pair, surged over 170 pips, from below $1.30 to above $1.3150.

The explanations for the strong rally boiled down to "hopes" that the Greek bond-swap deal would be reached.

As we've pointed out before, explanations such as these make sense only in retrospect. They tell you nothing about tomorrow's trend.

On February 15, while EUR/USD was still in the downtrend, Elliott Wave International's forex-focused Currency Specialty Service posted the following intraday forecast:

EURUSD (Intraday)
Posted On: Feb 15 2012
 1:28PM ET / Feb 15 2012 6:28PM GMT
Last Price: 1.3068

[Approaching a bottom]

The decline from 1.3322 looks mature, though there is no evidence it is complete. Allow for a dip below 1.3027 (to complete a flat correction) but we're focusing on identifying the upcoming reversal. A rally in five waves at small degree would do the trick.

As expected, EUR/USD indeed dropped below $1.3027 before reversing upward on February 16.

The bullish February 15 forecast was based strictly on the Elliott wave pattern you see in the chart above. The converging trendlines labeled (i)-(ii)-(iii)-(iv)-(v) mark an ending diagonal triangle, which only forms when the trend gets exhausted, and a reversal is near.

This Elliott wave pattern warned one day before the EUR/USD rally began that the collective bias of the forex players about the euro would soon shift from bearish to bullish.

See our forex-focused Currency Specialty Service in action for yourself -- FREE -- during EWI's Forex FreeWeek. Details below.